Skip to main content

Timeline of Events

Editors Law

A pedestrian stops to read an issue of the antisemitic newspaper <i>Der Stuermer</i> (The Attacker) in a Berlin display box. <i>Der Stuermer</i>  was advertised in showcase displays near bus stops, busy streets, parks, and factory canteens throughout Germany. <i>Der Stuermer</i> served as a mouthpiece for Nazi ideology and its editor was a close associate of Hitler. Berlin, Germany, probably 1930s.

A pedestrian stops to read an issue of the antisemitic newspaper Der Stuermer (The Attacker) in a Berlin display box. Der Stuermer was advertised in showcase displays near bus stops, busy streets, parks, and factory canteens throughout Germany. Der Stuermer served as a mouthpiece for Nazi ideology and its editor was a close associate of Hitler. Berlin, Germany, probably 1930s. —Unknown or unpublished

October 4, 1933

The Editors Law (Schriftleitergesetz) forbids non-“Aryans” to work in journalism.

The German Propaganda Ministry (through its Reich Press Chamber) assumed control over the Reich Association of the German Press, the guild which regulated entry into the profession. Under the new Editors Law, the association kept registries of “racially pure” editors and journalists, and excluded Jews and those married to Jews from the profession. Propaganda Ministry officials expected editors and journalists, who had to register with the Reich Press Chamber to work in the field, to follow mandates and specific instructions handed down by the ministry. In paragraph 14 of the law, the regime required editors to omit from publication anything “calculated to weaken the strength of the Reich abroad or at home.”

x

Help Us Fight Hate

When Nazi symbols are openly used to promote hate, that’s a warning to all of us. Knowledge is power—donate today to fight back.