United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936
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World Response to Boycott
Ruth Langer, an Austrian swimmer who boycotted the games.
Ruth Langer, an Austrian swimmer who boycotted the games.
—USHMM #21744/Österreichisches Institut für Zeitgeschichte, Bildarchiv, Vienna, Austria
Gustav Flatow (standing, first from left) and his cousin Alfred (middle row, second from right), won first-place medals for Germany in gymnastics at the Athens Games in 1896. Gustav rejected an invitation to attend the 1936 Games.
Gustav Flatow (standing, first from left) and his cousin Alfred (middle row, second from right), won first-place medals for Germany in gymnastics at the Athens Games in 1896. Gustav rejected an invitation to attend the 1936 Games.
—USHMM #15213/Forum für Sportgeschichte— Förderverein für das Sportmuseum Berlin, Collection of Stefan Flatow
Philippe de Rothschild, a Jewish bobsledder from France, decided to boycott the 1936 Winter Games held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. St. Moritz, Switzerland. 1928.
Philippe de Rothschild, a Jewish bobsledder from France, decided to boycott the 1936 Winter Games held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. St. Moritz, Switzerland. 1928.
—USHMM #36299/Joan Littlewood, Baron Philippe (New York, 1984)
Judith Deutsch was one of three Jewish swimmers named to the Austrian team who chose to boycott the Olympics.
Judith Deutsch was one of three Jewish swimmers named to the Austrian team who chose to boycott the Olympics.
—Pierre Gildesgamme Maccabi Sport Museum, Ramat Gan, ISRAEL
Sammy Luftspring, the top-ranked lightweight boxer in Canada, decided not to compete in the Olympic trials. Norman “Babe” Yack, another promising Jewish Canadian boxer, also opposed the Games.
Sammy Luftspring, the top-ranked lightweight boxer in Canada, decided not to compete in the Olympic trials. Norman “Babe” Yack, another promising Jewish Canadian boxer, also opposed the Games.
—USHMM #21745/Courtesy of Dr. George Eisen

The Museum’s exhibitions are supported by the Lester Robbins and Sheila Johnson Robbins Traveling and Special Exhibitions Fund, established in 1990.

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