United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936
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Racism
Antisemitism and racism pervaded the Nazi world view. In speeches, Hitler emphasized racial purity and the superiority of the "Germanic race" -- the so-called Aryan master race. As part of the drive to "purify" and strengthen the German population, a 1933 law permitted physicians to perform forced sterilizations of psychiatric patients and congenitally handicapped persons, Roma (Gypsies), and Blacks.

This photograph shows a classroom chart entitled “German Youth, Jewish Youth,”. It was published in a textbook on heredity, genealogy, and racial studies.
This photograph shows a classroom chart entitled “German Youth, Jewish Youth,”. It was published in a textbook on heredity, genealogy, and racial studies.
—USHMM #14945/Alfred Vogel, Erblehre, Abstammungs, und Rassenkunde in bildlicher Darstellung (Stuttgart, 1938)
This illustration from the Nazi magazine <i>Neues Volk</i> (New People), 1934, shows a German elementary school class in race hygiene.
This illustration from the Nazi magazine Neues Volk (New People), 1934, shows a German elementary school class in race hygiene.
—USHMM Photo Archives #13394
A slide for a lecture on genetics and race at the State Academy for Race and Health in Dresden shows the offspring of a German woman and an African colonial soldier stationed with French troops occupying the Rhineland after World War I. Some 500 teenagers--pejoratively called the “Rhineland bastards”--were forcibly sterilized after 1937 as part of Nazi policy to “purify” the German population. Ca. 1936.
A slide for a lecture on genetics and race at the State Academy for Race and Health in Dresden shows the offspring of a German woman and an African colonial soldier stationed with French troops occupying the Rhineland after World War I. Some 500 teenagers--pejoratively called the “Rhineland bastards”--were forcibly sterilized after 1937 as part of Nazi policy to “purify” the German population. Ca. 1936.
—USHMM #74845/Library of Congress

The Museum’s exhibitions are supported by the Lester Robbins and Sheila Johnson Robbins Traveling and Special Exhibitions Fund, established in 1990.

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