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February 25, 2016
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Time:
7 p.m.

Location:
JCC Manhattan
334 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10023

Map
 
Tracing a Lost Love:
One Family’s Forgotten History
Public Program
Sarah Wildman’s grandfather and his lover who are the subjects of the book <i>Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind. Courtesy of Sarah Wildman</i>
Sarah Wildman’s grandfather and his lover who are the subjects of the book Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind. Courtesy of Sarah Wildman

After the Museum led the charge to open the International Tracing Service in Germany in 2007, researchers such as New York Times contributor Sarah Wildman have gained access to the extensive archive of documents relating to more than 17 million victims of Nazism. Wildman used ITS to research the fate of her relatives, as well as a mysterious woman her grandfather left behind in prewar Vienna, detailed in her book, Paper Love.

Speakers
Diane Afoumado, Chief of Research and Reference, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum 
Sarah Wildman, Author of Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind 

Copies of Wildman's book will be available for purchase and for signing. Please note, the venue will be charging $5 per person at the door for this event.

Co-presented with JCC Manhattan



QUESTIONS/CONTACTS
Registration Assistance
646.505.5708


Please note that the Museum may be recording and photographing this event. By your presence you consent to the Museum's use of your image.


Related
Watch - Sarah Wildman, Author of Paper Love
Sarah Wildman reflects on the importance of accessing and understanding individual stories from the Holocaust.
Learn More
Accidental Witnesses to History: The Baker Collection
Americans living in Vienna when Germany annexed Austria in March 1938, Helen and Ross Baker documented what they saw through letters, a diary, and film.
Learn More
Preserving and Rebuilding the Archive of the Jewish Community Vienna
In 2000, the Jewish Community Vienna (IKG) discovered 500,000 pages of Holocaust-era documents. In 2002, the Museum began working with IKG to preserve the collection for scholars and survivors.
Learn More
Research Services
The Holocaust Survivors and Victims Resource Center will search for documents in the records of the International Tracing Service and other digitized collections of the Museum free of charge to survivors, their families, and families of victims.
Learn More
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