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October 20 - 21, 2017
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Location:
Humboldt State University
1 Harpst Street
Arcata, CA 95521

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(Un)Comfortable Identities:
Representations of Persecution
Campus Lecture
The Japanese American owner of this Oakland, California, store hung a sign reading “I am an American” on December 8, 1941—the day after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. The store was closed in March 1942 following orders to persons of Japanese descent to evacuate from certain West Coast areas. <i>Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress</i>
The Japanese American owner of this Oakland, California, store hung a sign reading “I am an American” on December 8, 1941—the day after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. The store was closed in March 1942 following orders to persons of Japanese descent to evacuate from certain West Coast areas. Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress

Friday, 1 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.–5:30 p.m. 

By exploring emerging research on the representation of historical persecution, this symposium seeks to examine the lasting impact of persecution on memory and identity for communities in different historical contexts. In bringing together educators and scholars from diverse disciplines, we aim to initiate meaningful dialogue about trauma, identity, violence, and discrimination against communities in Europe and the Pacific Northwest. This program is part of a wider outreach initiative to bring Holocaust studies into conversation with ethnic studies in the North American academy.

For a full list of panels and presentations, click here.

Keynote Address
Friday, October 20, 5:30 p.m.
Cleansing the Nation in Pure Conscience: Notion of Purity and of Purification
Katharina von Kellenbach, Professor of Religious Studies, St. Mary’s College of Maryland

This symposium is co-sponsored by the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the dean's office of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, as well as the Department of Critical Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and the Department of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University.

This program is made possible by a generous grant from the Robert and Myra Kraft Family Foundation to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Co-organized with Humboldt State University



QUESTIONS/CONTACTS
Jake Newsome, PhD
202.382.0263


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