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September 27, 2017
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Free
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Location:
Miles College
5500 Myron Massey Boulevard
Fairfield, AL 35064

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Toward Healing and Reconciliation:
Lessons from the Holocaust and the Jim Crow South
Campus Lecture
Community and religious leaders, including Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (second from right), in the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights, Alabama, 1965. <i>Copyright Dan Budnik</i>
Community and religious leaders, including Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (second from right), in the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights, Alabama, 1965. Copyright Dan Budnik

In this educational forum, scholars, students, and the public will explore the lessons that can be drawn from the study of the systems of targeted oppression and racial violence in Nazi Germany and the Jim Crow South within their specific historical contexts. Special attention will be given to the ways in which religious institutions either challenged or justified the racial discrimination in their respective societies.  

Schedule
11 a.m.–Noon
Welcome and lecture on religion and the Holocaust (Brown Hall Chapel & Auditorium)

Noon–1:30 p.m.
Lunch (for purchase in the Campus Dining Hall)

2 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
Campus dialogue — Toward Healing and Reconciliation: Lessons from the Holocaust and the Jim Crow South (Pearson Hall Auditorium)

5 p.m.–6 p.m.
Evening meal for purchase (Campus Dining Hall)

6 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Information session on educational opportunities for students and faculty at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (Williams Welcome Center) 

Unless otherwise noted, all events are free and open to the public.

This event is co-sponsored by the Miles College Division of Humanities. Generous support was provided by a grant from the Robert and Myra Kraft Family Foundation to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.



QUESTIONS/CONTACTS
Jake Newsome, PhD
202.382.0263


Please note that the Museum may be recording and photographing this event. By your presence you consent to the Museum's use of your image.


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