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August 28, 2017
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Ticket Price:
Free
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Time:
1 p.m.

Location:
Georgia State University
Troy Moore Library
25 Park Place NE
Atlanta, GA 30303

Map
 
Religion and Public Life in the Holocaust and the Jim Crow South
Campus Lecture
Beatrice Muchman while in hiding wearing her first communion dress.  She is standing next to Father Vaes and her cousin Henri who is a choir boy. <i> US Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy Beatrice Muchman.</i>
Beatrice Muchman while in hiding wearing her first communion dress. She is standing next to Father Vaes and her cousin Henri who is a choir boy. US Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy Beatrice Muchman.

In this campus panel discussion, scholars and the campus community will explore the ways in which religious institutions in Nazi Germany and the Jim Crow South either challenged or justified the discrimination and racial violence in their respective societies.

Speakers
Dr. Victoria Barnett, Director of Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Dr. Glenn T. Eskew, Professor of History, Georgia State University
Dr. Monique Moultrie, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Georgia State University

Moderator 
Dr. Jelena Subotic, Associate Professor of Political Science, Georgia State University

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Human Rights & Democracy, the Departments of Political Science and Religious Studies, and the Jean Beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics at Georgia State University. Generous support was provided by the Leonard and Sophie Davis Fund.



QUESTIONS/CONTACTS
Jake Newsome, PhD
202.382.0263


Please note that the Museum may be recording and photographing this event. By your presence you consent to the Museum's use of your image.


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