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February 15, 2018
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Ticket Price:
Free
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Time:
7 p.m.

Location:
US Holocaust Memorial Museum
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW
Washington, DC 20024

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Saints and Liars:
American Relief and Rescue Workers during the Nazi Era
Public Program
Marjorie McClelland, an American Quaker relief worker in Marseille, France, holds a Jewish refugee child named Toni in 1942, shortly before she left for the United States on a transport sponsored by the Joint Distribution Committee. <i>Courtesy of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee</i>
Marjorie McClelland, an American Quaker relief worker in Marseille, France, holds a Jewish refugee child named Toni in 1942, shortly before she left for the United States on a transport sponsored by the Joint Distribution Committee. Courtesy of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

Americans traveled around the globe to offer relief, and to rescue those targeted by Nazi Germany and its allies. Who were these intrepid souls who, unlike so many of their fellow citizens, took action? What did they accomplish and how did they manage to make a difference? Exploring the experiences of the Americans who went abroad before and during the Holocaust and those whom they helped, Dr. Debórah Dwork opens a window on the derring-do and the daily grind of desperate rescue operations.

Speaker
Dr. Debórah Dwork, Rose Professor of Holocaust History and Founding Director of the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University, and 2018 J. B. and Maurice Shapiro Senior Scholar-in-Residence at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies

THE J. B. AND MAURICE C. SHAPIRO SENIOR SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE FELLOWSHIP, endowed by the J. B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Charitable Trust, enables the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies to bring a distinguished scholar to the Museum each year to conduct innovative research about the Holocaust and to disseminate this work to the public. The scholar-in-residence also leads seminars, lectures at universities in the United States, and serves as a resource for the Museum, educators, students, and the general public.



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