Keyword(s): “shanghai” matching any media type
Found 43 matches
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"Our Life"
Special victory issue of "Our Life" published on September 7, 1945, to commemorate the liberation of Shanghai.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Rebeka Ilutovich

Announcement of restricted zone for stateless refugees in Shanghai
Proclamation issued on February 18, 1943, by the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy authorities establishing, for reasons of "military necessity," a "designated area" for "stateless" refugees" in the Hongkew area of the International Settlement.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Eric Goldstaub

Arrival of refugees in Shanghai
A photo from the North China Daily News showing the arrival of Jewish refugees in Shanghai.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Eric Goldstaub

Boy Scout badges
Handmade Boy Scout badges worn by German Jewish refugee children. British expatriates had transplanted the Boy Scout organization to Shanghai many years earlier. When the Jews from Poland arrived in 1941, they joined a much larger refugee community: an established community of some 4,000 Russian Jews, and more than 17,000 German and Austrian Jewish refugees who had fled Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Gary Matzdorff

Boy Scout scarf
Boy Scout scarf worn by German Jewish refugee children. British expatriates had transplanted the Boy Scout organization to Shanghai many years earlier. When the Jews from Poland arrived in 1941, they joined a much larger refugee community: an established community of some 4,000 Russian Jews, and more than 17,000 German and Austrian Jewish refugees who had fled Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Eric Bergtraun

Boy Scouts in Shanghai
Gary Matzdorff camping with his Boy Scout group in Shanghai, ca. 1939. British expatriates had transplanted the Boy Scout organization to Shanghai many years earlier. When the Jews from Poland arrived in 1941, they joined a much larger refugee community: an established community of some 4,000 Russian Jews, and more than 17,000 German and Austrian Jewish refugees who had fled Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Gary Matzdorff

End of war
A rickshaw driver passes buildings in Shanghai decorated with a victory painting of Allied flags.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Ernest G. Heppner

Ernest G. Heppner, born 1921, Breslau, Germany
Describes arrival in Shanghai in 1939 [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Ernest G. Heppner, born 1921, Breslau, Germany
Describes arbitrary nature of receiving passes to enter and exit the Shanghai ghetto area [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Ernest G. Heppner, born 1921, Breslau, Germany
Describes encounter with Yeshiva students in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Ernest G. Heppner, born 1921, Breslau, Germany
Describes Shanghai after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Ernest G. Heppner, born 1921, Breslau, Germany
Describes bombing and its aftermath in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

German refugee in Shanghai
Frau Schoenberg, a German refugee in Shanghai, with her belongings, including a sewing machine shipped from Germany. Despite her shabby, cramped quarters in Shanghai, she tried to create a semblance of her former domestic life. When the Jews from Poland arrived in 1941, they joined a much larger refugee community: an established community of some 4,000 Russian Jews, and more than 17,000 German and Austrian Jewish refugees who had fled Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of John & Harriet Isaack

Haggadah used by refugees in Shanghai
Title page of the Haggadah used in observance of Passover, which includes the notation "Published by a Group of Rabbinical Students, Shanghai, 1943." The publication was sponsored by the Shanghai branch of Philips, which had been the employer of Jan Zwartendijk, the Dutch acting consul in Kaunas.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, Gift of Rebeka Ilutovich

Hanni Sondheimer Vogelweid: Family Odyssey
Family Odyssey: Hanni Sondheimer Vogelweid remembers as a young woman waiting days in line in 1940 to obtain visas from the Japanese consulate in Kaunas, Lithuania. She recalls the map her father marked showing their Trans-Siberian journey, the hardships of life in Shanghai, and her happiness meeting American soldiers stationed there after the war.
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM/Stephen Stept, Firstlight Pictures

Japanese propaganda
These five images on matchbox covers are typical of the anti-American and anti-British sentiment that flooded Shanghai during the war.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Joseph Fiszman

Jewish artists' exhibition in Shanghai
Catalogue of an exhibition of Jewish artists' work at the Shanghai Jewish Club, May 5-8, 1943.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Rebeka Ilutovich

Jewish refugees in Shanghai
Jewish refugees in an alley off of Chusan Road in Hongkew.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Horst Eisfelder

Leo Hanin, born 1913, Vilna
Describes situation when Japanese officials forced the remaining refugees to leave for Shanghai, China, then under Japanese control and a much dreaded final destination [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Map showing borders of restricted zone for refugees in Shanghai
A map from the North China Daily News showing the borders of the zone in Shanghai to which stateless refugees will be confined from February 1943 on.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Eric Goldstaub

Mir Yeshiva
Students and teachers of the exiled Mir Yeshiva study in the sanctuary of the Beth Aharon synagogue on Museum Road in Shanghai. Among those pictured are: Rabbi Chezkel Lewensztejn (front row, first from the left); Rabbi Chaim L. Szmuelowicz, acting dean (front row, second from the right); and Rabbi J.D. Epstein, secretary (front row, first from the right). Mir emerged as the only eastern European yeshiva to survive the Holocaust intact.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Rabbi Jacob Ederman

Moses Zupnik, born 1917, Frankfurt, Germany
Describes facilities for the Mir Yeshiva in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Newspaper office in Shanghai
Men in front of a sign reading "Our Life and Editorial and Business Office" in Shanghai. The newspaper Our Life (Unzer Leben) was produced by Russian Jews and appeared from 1941 to 1945 in Russian, Yiddish, and English. Refugee journalists from Poland were frequent contributors.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Rebeka Ilutovich

Norbert Swislocki, born 1936, Warsaw, Poland
Describes air raid in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Norbert Swislocki, born 1936, Warsaw, Poland
Describes making and selling artificial honey in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Norbert Swislocki, born 1936, Warsaw, Poland
Describes life in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Norbert Swislocki, born 1936, Warsaw, Poland
Describes finding out about the Holocaust [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM

Norbert Swislocki: Family Odyssey
Family Odyssey: Norbert Swislocki recalls the dangers he faced as a young child fleeing Warsaw with his mother in the cold winter of 1939. His parents saved articles of clothing, travel brochures, a school report card, and other objects that evoke the family’s flight to Japan and refuge in Shanghai during the war.
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM/Stephen Stept, Firstlight Pictures

Ration stamps
Ration stamps for sugar, matches, margarine, soap, and charcoal issued Jewish refugees in Shanghai during the war, listing the shops where purchases could be made.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Norbert Swislocki

Refugee dentist in Shanghai
Dr. Heinrich Mannes, a refugee dentist in Shanghai. When the Jews from Poland arrived in 1941, they joined a much larger refugee community: an established community of some 4,000 Russian Jews, and more than 17,000 German and Austrian Jewish refugees who had fled Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of John & Harriet Isaack

Refugees looking for names of survivors
Jewish refugees in Shanghai search for the names of loved ones on lists of survivors, 1946.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Refugee's suitcase
A leather suitcase carried by a refugee out of Poland. The suitcase is covered with paper stickers of various Japanese shipping lines, including NYK to Shanghai, Oriental Hotel, and Kobe and Grand Cafe. A small group of refugees left Japan for Harbin, Manchuria, where a small Jewish community existed. One of them, Samuel Fishbain, carried this suitcase with him to the city where he joined his brother, a businessman there.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Sandra Fishbain

Report card for Jewish refugee in Shanghai
Report card for Norbert Swislocki, a Polish Jewish refugee child at the Peter Pan School in Shanghai.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Norbert Swislocki

Shanghai
Erwin Eisfelder stands outside Cafe Louis on Ward Road. Shanghai. The café, operated by his family, was a popular gathering place for refugees in Shanghai during the war years.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Horst Eisfelder

Shanghai
Shanghai's famous harbor-side roadway, the bund, in the 1930s.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C.

Shanghai Evening Post cartoon
A cartoon from the Shanghai Evening Post portraying the plight of Jewish refugees in Asia. February 4, 1941.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Eric Goldstaub

Shanghai street scene
Jewish refugees and Chinese vendors on Chusan Road, Hongkew, 1940s.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Horst Eisfelder

Shanghai street scene
Destitute Chinese man lies in front of Cafe Max, which was operated by Jewish refugees in Hongkew, 1940s.
Type: Photograph
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Horst Eisfelder

Sign restricting movement of refugees
One of many signs displayed along the Shanghai ghetto's boundaries: "Stateless Refugees are Prohibited to Pass Here without Permission." Such signs were constant reminders that the movements of refugees were restricted.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Gary Matzdorff

Silver goblets
Silver stem goblets belonging to the Caspary family, brought from Bublitz, Germany, and used in Shanghai by the Caspary family for blessings (Kiddush) over wine on the Sabbath and Jewish holidays. The Casparys were Orthodox Jews who operated a kosher restaurant frequented by yeshiva students from Poland.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Sol Zalcgendler

Volume carried by refugee Mir Yeshiva member
Mlochim, the Book of Kings from Jewish Scripture, carried from Poland to Vilna by Mir Yeshiva member Chaim Gorfinkel. Mir was one of the first yeshivas to depart for Vilna. In early 1941, seizing an opportunity to continue their escape, the rabbis and students of the Mir Yeshiva traveled as a group across the Soviet Union to Japan and then to Shanghai. Mir emerged as the only eastern European yeshiva to survive the Holocaust intact.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of Sarah Landesman

Woodblock print of street scene in Shanghai
David Bloch, untitled woodblock print with watercolor, ca. 1945. Bloch, a German Jewish refugee, depicted typical shops in "Little Vienna," as Chusan Road in Hongkew became known.
Type: Object
Credits:
USHMM, courtesy of David Bloch

Yonia Fain, born 1914, Russia
Describes refugee life in Shanghai [1999 interview].
Type: Video
Credits:
USHMM
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