United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
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NAME
Leah Svette
DATE
April 30, 2010 08:42 PM
LOCATION
Newton Falls
RESPONSE
This will be one of the most remembered moments in world history. It is so important that we remember this not only for those who were lost but for us as well.
Listening to the survivors and hearing how they went from everything to nothing so quickly was terrifying. How they lost faith in God and lost there way. I will never comprehend the struggle. But i will comprhend the fact that this needs to be remebered!
NAME
Kate Gaddis
DATE
April 06, 2010 08:36 AM
LOCATION
Fort Worth, TX
RESPONSE
After listening to a survivor, I become a wittness to their legacy and their life. I am very grateful for each of them that I get to listen to. Like, Peter Feigl, Elie Wiesel, Felicitas garda, and so forth. They are all so very deeply important.
NAME
Serge Small
DATE
March 07, 2010 02:19 PM
LOCATION
Florida
RESPONSE
As a child of survivors and as a history teacher, that answer comes easily to me; to make sure succeeding generations know the stories of the evil that befell this world of ours, to know the stories of those that survived. By studying (and by extension, teaching) the Holocaust, the next generation can realize how easily it can be to fall into the conditions that led to the Holocaust, and thereby learn the ways to prevent that reoccurrence.
Growing up 2nd generation, I remember the silences that filled the room when my parents would drift off into the memories of their own personal hell. I teach about the silence as well as the noise.
NAME
Brenda Mellowe
DATE
March 05, 2010 01:09 PM
LOCATION
 
RESPONSE
It is important to study the Holocaust to prevent these atrocities from happening again. As the people who went through the Holocaust age and die, we no longer will have the eyewitness accounts that these people have provided us. We need to preserve videos, written accounts, testimonies, photographs from these people so we can remember what happened and never allow it to happen again.

Studying the Holocaust also reminds us to appreciate our freedoms today in the U.S.A. Sometimes we become complacent and take these freedoms for granted. As I watch children in their daily life, and see them laughing and enjoying the riches of America, I wonder how much they appreciate what they have. Even with the recession, they are wealthy and don’t even think about a life without their Ipods and videogames . We tend to be materialistic and therefore need a re-awakening of what was and could be again if we are not careful.
NAME
Connie
DATE
March 05, 2010 11:43 AM
LOCATION
Florida
RESPONSE
The lessons we learn from studying the Holocaust are important because we all need to stand up and speak out against wrongs that are committed by one human being against another, to keep alive the memory of those who died, those who resisted and those who helped, and to keep telling the stories of the survivors as a tribute to their strength and courage.
NAME
robbin chamoff
DATE
March 04, 2010 07:16 PM
LOCATION
coral springs, florida
RESPONSE
The Holocaust has shown us so many aspects of human behavior. It is a true case study of looking at historical predictors and then being able to forecast how people would react to the same conditions. Economic depression is a strong historical predictor and the Holocaust has taught us that some of the most evil people on earth can show their true self during this time while other show courage beyond belief. The never ending battle of good and evil it is timeless but to the degree of the Holocaust it must never be repeated. Yet why do those in Africa suffer so?
NAME
Gingit
DATE
March 04, 2010 05:50 PM
LOCATION
Florida
RESPONSE
Please continue to teach the Holocaust to students thoughout the world so that another genocide of innocent men, women and children will never again happen to any group of people in the world.
NAME
John Lamb
DATE
March 02, 2010 08:48 AM
LOCATION
Miramar High School, Miramar. FL.
RESPONSE
It is important to study the Holocaust to prevent such events from ever happening again. The atrocities committed, and the documentation provided by holocaust organizations, websites, museums etc. provide an important information conduit for teachers, students, and families that facilitate the teaching of the holocaust in a compassionate yet straightforward manner. It's a common expression but very relevant in Holocaust studies; Those who do not study history, are doomed to repeat it.
NAME
j cruz
DATE
March 01, 2010 01:54 PM
LOCATION
Florida
RESPONSE
It is important to study the Holocaust because thru education we can learn about our past. With this info we can feel more passion for speaking out against other crimes against humanity that are going on today.
NAME
Barbara
DATE
February 20, 2010 05:14 PM
LOCATION
Plantation, FL
RESPONSE
This horrific period in history serves to remind us to be ever vigilant against forms of racism, hatred, religious intolerance, and bigotry. The survivors of this period should be remembered in all of our prayers for their continued longevity and resilience under sub-human conditions, until all of their recollections and lives can be documented.

The world must stop and take the time to remember these heinous acts and be ever vigilant for those persons who begin to blame segments of society for the rest of society's ills.

I have studied this period in history since I was ten years old and reliving WW II battles with my father and uncles. One uncle relived his experiences of what he saw during the liberation of Dachau. After fifty years of reading about this period I should be immune to the pictures, sights and sounds of Hitler's war, but I still say prayers for each of the persons I see in photographs or video. I wonder how their lives would have been and what were their thoughts as they went through those experiences in the concentration camps.

We owe the survivors a debt of gratitude and need God's forgiveness for our nation turning a blind eye to Hitler's atrocities.
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