but Free Americans Can Still Read Them
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Fighting the fires of hate: America and the Nazi Book Burnings
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Discussion

found 28 stories · showing stories 21 – 28

 
Immediate American Responses
The Nazi book burnings were an attempt to restrict the German reading public's free access to ideas. Share your thoughts on why Americans were concerned about this event beyond their borders.
(28 postings)

JOE HOPES AND DREAMS ARE COMPONENTS OF BOOKS. IF YOU BURN ONE OF THESE ELEMENTS..YOU HAVE NOTHING.
May 27, 2004 04:46 AM
 
Sam the burning of books is the burning of cultures and ideas. It is harder than you think to regain ideas and culture. Customs and history are just as important as lives
May 07, 2004 12:53 PM
 
Rhonda I am completely appauled by America's light response. It seemed that they responded quicker to book burnings than they did the burnings of almost 1 million children. Books and ideas can be replaced...the question is and I don't mind if anybody laughs at my sarcasim...can you replace a life taken by a burning?
November 03, 2003 01:19 PM
 
Elizabeth K Best PhD The book-burnings during the 3rd Reich were of offense in America and beyond but for the wrong reason. It was not just a limited freedom which we so often protest, but an attempt to eradicate freedom of spirit. All that was creative, all art, every artist, musician and writer was censored, restricted or erased. This is because the Nazis knew the power of Art,Music and Writing: it moves the heart, and the heart was the first prisoner.
July 17, 2003 01:06 AM
 
Fred Meyer For me, this exhibit provides some additional background detail for our family history. In the Nazi era, my father worked with local committees in the U.S. to bring Jewish artists and academics from Germany to the U.S. Although I had been aware of the banning of specific artworks and artists by the Nazis, I hadn't been aware of -- or I had forgotten about -- the book burnings described here.
May 22, 2003 06:28 PM
 
JAck I wish it never happened, so much knowledge lost and lives!
May 14, 2003 10:23 AM
 
Lesley I kind of felt the same way. There's that cartoon "On the Altars of the Nazis" but after that it seems as if the "American response" turned into a glitzy poster parade.
May 06, 2003 01:00 PM
 
Manolo I find it disturbing that there was great public outcry in the US about burned books but little comparable protest about mass murder of innocents....
May 06, 2003 12:52 PM
 

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