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Dr. Salomea Kape: School

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Transcript

The headmaster was a...a person we will I will never forget. She was, we called her Director and her name was Stella Rein and she was, for all who are still alive, um, we will never forget this dedicated woman, who in spite of hunger and, uh, very difficult situations in the ghetto, that we will, I will talk about it later, ahh, gave us um, formed the school, made a curriculum for the school. And in this school for the few hours that we were there we were children and students again. And this school also provided, she make sure, that the school provided for us a soup, a soup a day. And soup was equivalent of life. It was very important to have the soup and it was very difficult for her to obtain the soup for every child and the teachers in the ghetto. On the bottom the soup was thick and ah, but not ah if you were first you got mostly the water from the soup and uh, the, the, the farther you were you had maybe the prospect of getting a thicker soup. But I do, but you know the soup was very important for life but the more important thing was the atmosphere in school, of learning you know. We had, I remember, Polish was the main, was the language that we used you know and I really wonder why because this was already Germany, the third reich, because Lodz belonged now to Germany, this is what they did. So we learned we had Polish we had the German language, we had Latin, mathematics, history, botany. This was a normal curriculum and we learned a lot so that after the war, I was able to go and I had a hiatus of four years, and I was able to go and pass the exams and go to the third or fourth class at that time.

Dr. Salomea Kape was born in May 1926. In 1940 her family was imprisoned inside the Lodz ghetto along with other Jews. She attended the ghetto high school. Her mother worked as a midwife in the ghetto hospital. The family stayed in the ghetto due to her mother’s intuition in August 1944 during the liquidation of the ghetto. They survived there until liberation by Soviet forces in January 1945. After liberation, Salomea was able to complete her education. She graduated from medical school in 1952. In 1957, Dr. Kape and her husband Mendel left Poland. Their son John was born in 1963 in Israel. The Kape family moved to New York in 1966. Dr. Kape currently resides in New York.