United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Collier's, December 12, 1942
The Art and Politics of Arthur Szyk
wartime caricaturist

historical film
historical film
historical photo
[USHMM #93825/Wm. Hallam Webber, Maryland;
Original dimensions: 13 5/8" x 10 11/16"]
Collier's, December 12, 1942
The Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, killed more than 2,400 Americans and destroyed or damaged much of the U.S. Navy's Pacific Fleet. Described by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as a "date which will live in infamy," the action immediately brought America into the war. To commemorate the first anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Collier's used the artist's rendering of a Japanese vampire bat preparing to attack the Hawaiian island naval outpost. Szyk consciously imitated Japanese artwork, even down to the inscription on the bomb, which reads: Air Force Pilot.


 
[Historical film footage:
Japan attacks Pearl Harbor

United States
December 7, 1941

English

Playing time :55

National Archives - Film ]


While Japanese diplomats in Washington, D.C., negotiated with Secretary of State Cordell Hull, Japanese planes bombed the naval base at Pearl Harbor. American outrage at the surprise attack overcame isolationist sentiment and the United States declared war on Japan the following day.


 
[Historical film footage:
U.S. enters World War II

United States
December 8, 1941

English

Playing time 2:53

National Archives - Film ]


Portion of the speech in which President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked the U.S. Congress to declare war on Japan following the previous day's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.


 
A U.S. warship, the USS Shaw, explodes during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. Hawaii, December 7, 1941.
[USHMM/LC #na171/National Archives]

A U.S. warship, the USS Shaw, explodes during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Hawaii, December 7, 1941.



Introduction
Jewish Artist
Action-not Pity
Szyk resources
Action-not Pity
MORE Szyk


[Back]